David Gilmour

Hanging on in quiet desperation is the English way…

David Jon Gilmour CBE (/ˈɡɪlmɔːr/ GHIL-mor; born 6 March 1946) is an English songwriter, guitarist, and singer who was a member of rock band Pink Floyd. He joined as guitarist and co-lead vocalist in 1968 shortly before the departure of founder member Syd Barrett.[1] Pink Floyd achieved international success with the concept albums The Dark Side of the Moon (1973), Wish You Were Here (1975), Animals (1977), and The Wall (1979). By the early 1980s, they had become one of the highest-selling and most acclaimed acts in music history; by 2012, they had sold more than 250 million records worldwide, including 75 million in the United States.[2] Following the departure of Roger Waters in 1985, Pink Floyd continued under Gilmour’s leadership and released three more studio albums.

Gilmour has produced a variety of artists, such as the Dream Academy, and has released four solo studio albums: David GilmourAbout FaceOn an Island, and Rattle That Lock. He is also credited for bringing singer-songwriter Kate Bush to public attention. As a member of Pink Floyd, he was inducted into the US Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1996, and the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2005. In 2003, Gilmour was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE). He was awarded with the Outstanding Contribution title at the 2008 Q Awards.[3] In 2011, Rolling Stone ranked him number 14 in their list of the greatest guitarists of all time.[4] He was also voted number 36 in the greatest voices in rock by Planet Rock listeners in 2009.[5]

Hawkwind era Lemmy

1971–1975: Hawkwind

In August 1971, Lemmy joined the space rock band Hawkwind, who were based in Ladbroke Grove, London, as a bassist and vocalist. He had no previous experience as a bass guitarist, and was cajoled into joining immediately before a benefit gig in Notting Hill by bandmate Michael “Dik Mik” Davies, to have two members who enjoyed amphetamines.[16] Lemmy states that he originally auditioned for Hawkwind as a guitarist, but on the morning of the Notting Hill gig, they decided not to get another guitarist. By chance, the bass player didn’t show up and left his equipment in the van. He often said, “Their bass player was pretty much saying ‘please steal my gig!’ So I stole his gig.” Lemmy quickly developed a distinctive style that was strongly shaped by his early experience as a rhythm guitarist, often using double stops and chords rather than the single note lines preferred by most bassists. His bass work was a distinctive part of the Hawkwind sound during his tenure, perhaps best documented on the double live album Space Ritual. He also provided the lead vocals on several songs, including the band’s biggest UK chart single, “Silver Machine“, which reached #3 in 1972.

In May 1975, during a North American tour, Lemmy was arrested at the Canadian border in Windsor, Ontario on drug possession charges. The border police mistook the amphetamine he was carrying for cocaine and he spent five days in jail before being released without charge. The band were forced to cancel some shows and, tired of what they saw as his erratic behaviour, decided to fire him.[17][18]

He once said of Hawkwind: “I did like being in Hawkwind, and I believe I’d still be playing with them today if I hadn’t been kicked out. It was fun onstage, not so much offstage. They didn’t want to mesh with me. Musically, I loved the drummer, the guitar player. It was a great band.” [19]

Simon House

Simon House (born 29 August 1948 in NottinghamNottinghamshireEngland) is a composer and classically trained violinist and keyboard player, perhaps best known for his work with space rock band Hawkwind. His arrival in 1974 introduced a new element to the band’s style. He was the first conspicuously trained musician to join, and the sound that emerged on Hall of the Mountain Grill was a previously unheard, lush chaos which sounded a little like Black Sabbath meets The Moody Blues.

Before Hawkwind, House played in High Tide and the Third Ear Band, who contributed the soundtrack to Roman Polanski‘s Macbeth. Guitarist Tony Hill recounted how House became a member of High Tide: “[Pete Pavli and I were] hanging out with and crashing where we could at Mike’s or Wayne’s. Simon ended up crashing there as well. Simon was playing bass then. He said: ‘I used to play violin, you know?’ So I said ‘Get it!’ That was basically it.”[1]

Justin Sullivan

Justin Edward Sullivan (born 8 April 1956, Jordans, Buckinghamshire) is an English singer and songwriter. He is also the frontman and lyricist of the British rock band New Model Army,[1] which he formed in 1980 together with drummer Robert Heaton and bassist Stuart Morrow in their hometown of Bradford, Yorkshire. In the early 1980s he performed under the stage name of “Slade the Leveller”,[2] referring to the Levellers

Dave Brock

David Anthony Brock (born 20 August 1941) is an English singer-songwriter and musician. He plays electric guitar, keyboards, bass and oscillators. He is a founder, sole constant member and musical focus of the English space rock group Hawkwind.[1] Brock was honoured with a lifetime achievement award at the annual Progressive Music Awards in 2013.[2]

Lemmy

Ian Fraser Kilmister (24 December 1945 – 28 December 2015), better known as Lemmy, was an English singer, songwriter, and musician. He is best known as the founder, lead singer, bassist, primary songwriter and only continuous member of the British heavy metal band Motörhead.

A foundational force in the genre following the advent of the new wave of British heavy metal, he was known for his appearance, which included his signature friendly mutton chops, his military-influenced fashion sense, and his gravelly rasp of a voice that was once declared “one of the most recognisable voices in rock”.[1] He was also noted for his unique way of singing, which was once described as “looking up towards a towering microphone tilted down into his weather-beaten face”.[2] He was also known for his bass playing style and using his Rickenbacker bass to create an “overpowered, distorted rhythmic rumble”,[2] while another notable aspect of his bass sound was that he often played power chords using heavily overdriven tube stacks by Marshall.

Lemmy was born in Stoke-on-Trent and grew up between there, the nearby towns of Newcastle-under-Lyme and Madeley, and later the Welsh village of Benllech. He was influenced by rock and roll and the early works of the Beatles, which led to him playing in several rock groups in the 1960s such as the Rockin’ Vickers. He worked as a roadie for Jimi Hendrix and The Nice before joining the space rock band Hawkwind in 1971, singing lead vocals on their hit “Silver Machine“. In 1975, he was fired from Hawkwind after an arrest for drug possession; that same year, he became the founder, lead singer, bassist, and songwriter of Motörhead. The band’s success peaked around 1980 and 1981, including the hit single “Ace of Spades” and the chart-topping live album No Sleep ’til Hammersmith.

Lemmy continued to record and tour regularly with Motörhead until his death on 28 December 2015 in Los Angeles, where he had lived since 1990. He was diagnosed with prostate cancer two days before his death. Alongside his music career, he had minor roles and cameos in film and television. He was known for his hard-living lifestyle, which included chain-smoking and daily consumption of high amounts of alcohol and amphetamines.

Huw Lloyd-Langton

50% of all profits from this print will be donated to Sea Shepherd

Richard Hugh “Huw” Lloyd-Langton (6 February 1951 – 6 December 2012) was an English guitarist, best known as the guitarist for Hawkwind[1] at various times. He also had his own band, The Lloyd Langton Group, and was the session lead guitarist for UK band The Meads of Asphodel.

Ian Curtis

Ian Kevin Curtis (15 July 1956 – 18 May 1980) was an English singer-songwriter and musician. He was the lead singer and lyricist of the post-punk band Joy Division and recorded two albums with the group: Unknown Pleasures (1979) and Closer (1980). Curtis was known for his bass-baritone voice, dance style and songwriting typically filled with imagery of desolation, emptiness and alienation.

Curtis suffered from epilepsy and depression and took his own life on the eve of Joy Division’s first North American tour and shortly before the release of Closer. His death led to the band’s dissolution and the subsequent formation of New Order.

Despite their short career, Joy Division have exerted a wide-reaching influence. John Bush of AllMusic argues that they “became the first band in the post-punk movement by … emphasizing not anger and energy but mood and expression, pointing ahead to the rise of melancholy alternative music in the ’80s”.[1] According to critic Simon Reynolds, Joy Division’s influence has extended from contemporaries such as U2 and the Cure to later acts including InterpolBloc Party and EditorsRap artists such as Danny Brown and Vince Staples have cited the band as an influence.[2][3]